What makes us stop and listen to another?  When trying to influence others, tune in to station WIIFM (What’s In It For Me).  When trying to persuade or engage someone, your listener is asking: Can you save me time, save me $$, make me $$, make my day shorter, better, more successful, make me healthier, happier, more loving or loved? Before trying to persuade others, to be heard,  be sure you’re both tuned in to the same station. Let’s watch what happens in the Marriage Equality Act debate, or the gun debate.  What stations are people tuned in to?  What station is Congress, President Obama or the NRA tuned in to on each of these issues?  Are they the same?  Different?  Do they converge? Are we listening?  Are they or we being heard? Ask yourself who is being heard? Learn to target you message to your audience.

Ginny Pulos is president of Ginny Pulos Communications, Inc., a speech and media consultancy, and adjunct professor at NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies. She is an expert in presentation, storytelling and persuasion in corporate environments.r (www.ginnypulos.com). 

For more tips on speaking with confidence check our other blog posts. We welcome you to subscribe to our posts and the Ginny Pulos Communications Facebook page.

In tough spots, are you credible? Likeable? Trustworthy? You may never have to grapple with the glaring spotlight of testimony before Congress like Sotomayor, Hegel, Clinton or Jamie Dimon. Yet we regularly present ourselves in a variety of settings – at meetings, interviews, conferences or seminars. Some of us speak publicly all the time. But being the focus of attention can still challenge our confidence. In the coming days, I’ll share with you a few tips that will help you succeed in any face-to-face situation.

TIP OF THE WEEK. Focus on your message – not on how you’re feeling. — to overcome nervous jitters. How you approach the podium is key. Take the time to breathe from the diaphragm, smile and make eye contact with a familiar face. Know your opening and closing cold so you can connect at these two critical moments. Don’t try to cover up your nervousness. Experienced speakers learn to move beyond it by immediately moving to what they desperately need their audiences to know.

Ginny Pulos is president of Ginny Pulos Communications, Inc., a speech and media consultancy, and adjunct professor at NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies. She is an expert in presentation, storytelling and persuasion in corporate environments.r (www.ginnypulos.com). 

For more tips on speaking with confidence check our other blog posts. We welcome you to subscribe to our posts and the Ginny Pulos Communications Facebook page.

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I’m not sure if words can capture what a tremendous help you were to me in preparing my presentation two weeks ago. You provided exactly what I needed: The guidance to cut the presentation to its bare essentials, reordering it for maximum impact, extra polish in word choice, body language and delivery, and that all important dose of confidence that took the presentation from good to great. I’ve made many presentations in my day, and there’s no doubt in my mind that this was my finest. And I’ve no doubt that this resulted from your help.